Text Us! (512) 233-6707


Attorney ProfilesMEET OUR TEAM
Jack Zinda - Austin Personal Injury Attorney Joseph Caputo - Austin Personal Injury Attorney Burgess Williams Neil Solomon Ryan Toomey Christina Hagen Jason Aldridge Elecia Byrd Andrew Rogers Alaina Zermeno Cole Gumm Branson Rogers Elissa Harshman Brendan McQuaid Rolando Quesada Chelsea Cates Rian Butler Laura Browne Robert Zahradnik-Mitchell

Woman Sues JPMorgan Chase Foreclosure for Death of her Husband

Posted: July 11th, 2012 | Author: Austin-Personal-Injury-Blog
Categories: Personal Injury Blog, Wrongful Death

While a foreclosure isn’t physically violent, one Texas woman believes that the notification of a foreclosure was enough to kill her husband. The emotional shock translated into physical trauma, and she believes that this sparked a heart attack which caused his early death. The plaintiff, Wando Jo Engel, says that JPMorgan’s home foreclosure and eviction notice created so much stress that it overwhelmed her husband to death. The foreclosure was false- a mistake made by the company in their paperwork. The family of the deceased Harry Engel is suing JPMorgan for wrongful death as well was wrongful foreclosure and eviction notice.

The deceased father and husband was a minister and was 79-years-old at the time of his death. His wife claims that Engel collapsed in his favorite easy chair when he read the eviction notice that had arrived in the mail. The Engels’ lawyer says that the family is very close, and that Harry’s death was an unspeakable loss for them. The father had no significant medical problems that could have aided in his death. JPMorgan is fighting the lawsuit and saying that the case is riddled with factual inaccuracies. They say that they had not started the foreclosure, and that they were working with the Engel’s to avoid causing them to lose their home.

The Engels say that they have lived in their home for 22 years, and that they were up-to-date on their mortgage payments during the entire time. However, despite being faithful on their bills, they received a letter from their bank telling them to refinance their loan in 2009. They went to a local Chase branch and the advisor there told them to “miss a payment” so that they could qualify for government refinancing. The Engel’s did as they were told, and received a letter from a bank telling them to be current on their payments immediately. This set them back, because both spouses operated on a fixed income. Eventually, a representative from Chase arrived at their home and enforced an eviction notice. If you have been wrongly treated in an action that caused the injury or death of a loved one, then talk to someone at our firm today. We can help you to pursue justice in your case.